Brazil

Brazil’s primary energy consumption declined by 1.8% in 2016, well below the 10-year average of 3.7% growth, as fossil fuels consumption declined

Fast facts

  1. Brazil remained the world’s second largest producer of biofuels, accounting for 22.5% of global production.
  2. Brazil’s CO2 emissions from energy use declined for the second consecutive year in 2016.
  3. Brazil is the third largest generator of hydro power in the world, which increased in 2016 for the first time since 2011.

-1.8% Decline in Brazil’s energy consumption

2.2% Brazil’s share of global energy consumption

+4.3% Growth in Brazil’s energy production

  • Declining consumption of oil (-5.6%), natural gas (-12.5%) and coal (-6.8%) outweighed increases in hydro (+6.5%), renewables in power (+18.4%) and nuclear (+7.5%).
  • Oil remained the dominant fuel, accounting for 47% of Brazil’s primary energy consumption. Oil consumption declined by 150 Kb/d in 2016 to 3.0 Mb/d, the lowest level since 2012.
  • Hydro generation (29% of Brazil’s primary energy consumption) increased by 5.5 mtoe in 2016 to 87 mtoe.
  • Natural gas consumption (11% of Brazil’s energy consumption) declined by 5.1 Bcm in 2016 to 37 Bcm.
  • Renewables in power (6% of Brazil’s energy consumption) increased by 3.0 mtoe in 2016, more than double the 10-year average growth of 1.3 mtoe.
  • Coal consumption (6% of Brazil’s energy consumption) declined by 6.8% in 2016 to 16.5 mtoe.
  • Brazil’s energy production grew by 4.3% in 2016, higher than the 10-year average of 3.7%. Production of all fuels increased in 2016.
  • Brazil’s oil production increased by 80 Kb/d to 2.6 Mb/d in 2016, reaching a new record high. However, growth in 2016 (+3.2%) was slower than the 10-year average of 4.0%.
  • Natural gas production increased by 1.2% in 2016 to 23.5 Bcm, much slower than the 10-year average growth of 7.8%.
  • Biofuels production declined for the first time since 2011. Output declined by 4.3% compared to the 10-year average growth of 8.4%.
  • Energy intensity (the amount of energy required per unit of GDP) declined by 1.6% in 2016, well above the 10-year average of 0.9%.
  • CO2 emissions from energy use declined by 7.0% in 2016; this is in sharp contrast to the 10-year average growth of 4.0%.

Related content