Indonesia

Indonesia’s coal production declined by 14.4% - the first fall since our data began in 1980

Fast facts

  1. Domestic energy consumption nearly doubled over the past 15 years.
  2. Indonesia’s total energy production fell by 10.6% - in absolute terms, its biggest fall ever.
  3. Oil production continued to decline, falling to its lowest level since 1969. 
     

+3.9% Growth in Indonesia’s energy consumption

6.3% Indonesia’s share of global coal production

189% Ratio of natural gas production to consumption

  • Indonesia’s energy consumption increased by 3.9% in 2015, having nearly doubled over the last 15 years.
  • In 2015 growing consumption of coal (+15%) was partially offset by falling oil (-3.2%) and natural gas (-2.7%) consumption.
  • Coal consumption has doubled since 2010 and in 2015 coal became Indonesia’s dominant fuel (41.1% of energy consumption), followed by oil (37.6%) and then natural gas (18.3%).
  • Natural gas consumption fell by 1.1 bcm in 2015 - to its lowest level since 2008 and more than 8% lower than its peak in 2010.
  • After a sharp fall in 2014, hydro grew by 5.9% in 2015 and made up just under 2% of Indonesia’s energy consumption.
  • Indonesia produced 54% of its oil consumption in 2015, almost identical to 2014 and the lowest proportion in our records - this compares to an oil surplus in 2002 and a 75% ratio just five years ago.
  • Production of all fossil fuels fell in 2015: oil (-3.2%), gas (-0.3%) and coal (-14.4%).
  • Indonesia’s coal production fell to 392 million tonnes, the lowest level since 2012.
  • Indonesia is now the fifth largest coal producing country in the world - being overtaken by India in 2015.
  • Natural gas production was marginally lower in 2015 compared to the year before and 12.4% lower than the 2010 production peak.
  • The ratio of natural gas production to consumption increased to 189% in 2015, compared to 184% in 2014 and a 20-year average of around 200%.
  • Indonesia’s CO2 emissions from energy use increased by 5.7% in 2015, lower than the 10-year average (+6.0%).
  • Energy intensity (the amount of energy required per unit of GDP) decreased by 0.9% in 2015 - the same as the 10-year average.

Related content