US

The US remained the world’s largest producer of both oil and natural gas, despite declining production of both fuels in 2016

Fast facts

  1. In 2016 US domestic production was sufficient to meet 87% of domestic consumption, declining from 91% in 2015.
  2. In 2016 US renewables in power increased by 16.9%, but the US dropped to the world’s second largest consumer, after China.
  3. US CO2 emissions from energy use declined by 2.0% in 2016, faster than the 10-year average decline of 1.1%.

-0.4% Decline in US energy consumption

17.1% US share of global energy consumption

-0.4 Mb/d Decline in US oil production

  • Declining consumption of coal (-8.8%) outweighed increases in renewables (+16.9%), oil (+0.5%), natural gas (+0.5%), hydro (+5.9%), and nuclear (+0.7%).
  • Oil remained the dominant fuel, accounting for 38% of US energy consumption. Oil consumption increased by 100 Kb/d in 2016, the smallest increase since 2012, but higher than the 10-year average (-130 Kb/d).
  • Natural gas consumption (32% of US consumption) increased by just 0.3 Bcf/d in 2016 to 75.1 Bcf/d, less than the 10-year average growth of 1.4 Bcf/d. The US remained the world’s largest consumer of natural gas (22% of global consumption).
  • Coal consumption (16% of US consumption) declined by 33.4 mtoe in 2016 to 358.4 mtoe, the lowest level since 1978.
  • Renewables in power (4% of US consumption) increased by 12.3 mtoe in 2016. Hydro (3% of US consumption) increased in 2016 for the first time since 2011. Nuclear (8% of US consumption) increased by 1.9 mtoe, well above the 10-year average of 0.4 mtoe.
  • Primary energy production declined by 5.2% in 2016, well below the 10-year average of 2.4%.
  • Declining production of oil (-4.2%), gas (-2.5%) and coal (-19.0%), outweighed increases in renewables in power (+16.9%), hydro (+5.9%), nuclear (+0.7%) and biofuels (+5.4%).
  • US oil production declined for the first time since 2008, falling by 0.4 Mb/d to 12.4 Mb/d in 2016, the largest decline in the world in volume terms in 2016.
  • US natural gas production declined by 1.8 Bcf/d to 72.3 Bcf/d in 2016, the first annual decline since 2005. However, the US still remained the world’s largest producer of natural gas (21% of the world total).
  • US coal production declined by 84.5 mtoe to 364.8 mtoe, the lowest level in our database going back to 1981.
  • Energy intensity (the amount of energy required per unit of GDP) declined by 2.0% in 2016, the same as the 10-year average.

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