US

The US set new record highs for both oil and gas production in 2015 and the US remained the world’s largest producer of oil, natural gas, renewables and nuclear power

Fast facts

  1. The US set a new record for oil production at 12.7 mb/d in 2015.
  2. The US set a new record for natural gas production at 74.2 bcf/d in 2015.
  3. US CO2 emissions from energy use declined by 2.6% in 2015, faster than the 10-year average of -1.1%.
     

-0.9% Decline in US energy consumption

17.3% US share of global energy consumption

+1 Mb/d Growth in US oil production

  • Increasing consumption of natural gas (+3.0%), oil (+1.6%) and renewables in power (+7.5%), were not enough to outweigh declines in coal (-12.7%) and hydro (-3.2%) (nuclear consumption remained unchanged).
  • Oil remains the dominant fuel, accounting for 37% of US energy consumption. Oil consumption increased by 290 kb/d in 2015 but remains 1.4 mb/d below the record high set in 2005.
  • US natural gas consumption (31% of US energy consumption) continued to grow in 2015 and set a new record high at 75.3 bcf/d. The US remains the world’s largest consumer of gas (23% of global consumption).
  • Coal consumption (17% of US energy consumption) declined by 57 mtoe to 396 mtoe, the largest decline in the world in 2015.
  • Renewables in power (3% of US consumption) increased by 5 mtoe in 2015, the US remains the world’s largest consumer of renewable energy. Hydro (3% of US consumption) declined for the fourth consecutive year in 2015.
  • US production growth of oil (+8.5%), natural gas (+5.4%), renewables in power (+7.5%), and biofuels (+2.9%), outweighed declines in coal (-10.4%) and hydro (-3.2%).
  • Primary energy production grew by 1.6% (+32 mtoe) in 2015. Domestic production was sufficient to meet 91% of domestic consumption, the highest ratio since 1982.
  • US oil production increased by 1 mb/d in 2015 to 12.7 mb/d, a slowdown compared to 2014 growth, but still the largest increase in the world in 2015.
  • US natural gas production increased by 3.7 bcf/d in 2015, accounting for over 50% of global gas growth last year.
  • US net oil imports fell by 440 kb/d to 4.8 mb/d, the lowest level since 1985. Natural gas imports declined by 0.7 bcf/d to 2.6 bcf/d, the lowest level since 1986.
  • Energy intensity (the amount of energy required per unit of GDP) declined by 3.2% in 2015, much faster than the 10-year average of -1.7%.

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