CO₂ emissions

Global CO2 emissions from energy use were essentially flat in 2016 (+0.1%), well below the 10-year average growth of 1.6% and a third consecutive year of below average growth

During 2014-16, average emissions growth has been the lowest over any three-year period since 1981-83. The weakness was concentrated in emerging economies, with non-OECD emissions rising by just 0.8%, well below the 10-year average growth of 3.4%. OECD emissions declined by 1.0%, broadly in line with the 10-year average decline of 0.9%. Non-OECD countries accounted for a record 62.4% of global CO2 emissions.

On a country basis, India recorded the largest increment to CO2 emissions for a third consecutive year, growing by 113.7 million tonnes or 5% (in percentage terms, slightly below the 10-year average of 6%). Growth in emissions from coal and oil accounted for nearly all of the increase.

Other significant increases (>15 million tonnes) were seen in Indonesia (38.9 million tonnes, 7.6%); Turkey (18.8 million tonnes, 5.2%); Ukraine (16.6 million tonnes, 8.4%); Malaysia (16.3 million tonnes, 6.3%); and Pakistan (15.6 million tonnes, 8.5%).

Among countries with declining emissions, the US recorded the largest decrement to CO2 emissions for a second consecutive year (and the 6th of the past nine years), falling by 94.7 million tonnes or 2% (compared with the 10-year average decline of 1.1%). The decline in US coal-related emissions (-8.8%) moderated from a 13.6% decline in 2015, and was partly offset by growth in oil- and gas-related emissions.

Carbon dioxide emissions (million tonnes CO₂)

Carbon dioxide emissions (million tonnes CO₂)

Other significant declines (>15 million tonnes) were seen in China (-41.4 million tonnes, -0.7%); Brazil (-33.3 million tonnes, -7%); Russia (-31.8 million tonnes, -2.4%); the UK (-27 million tonnes, -6.5%); and Japan (-15.4 million tonnes, -1.5%).

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