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bp bioenergy HVO

Take an easy step to lower your fleet’s carbon emissions*

FAQs

Q. How do you calculate the CO2e emissions saving of at least 85% for bp bioenergy HVO?

Our claim is the ‘well-to-wheel’ (i.e. from the generation of the feedstocks through production to end-use by the customer) CO2e emissions saving for bp bioenergy HVO on a mass balance basis compared to fossil diesel.

 

We have chosen to use the energy-based methodology outlined in the 2024 RTFO Compliance Guidance (Section 8) to calculate the emissions savings. The actual CO2e values of the product are taken from certified Proof of Sustainability (PoS) documents issued by a scheme such as ISCC that is accepted by the Department of Transport for the purposes of RTFO compliance. The RTFO requires the use of a ‘mass balance’ (i.e. units in-units out) methodology and savings are calculated using a fossil fuel reference value of 94 gCO2e/MJ, which is the default value referenced in the RTFO 2024 compliance guidance.

 

The actual CO2e emissions saving achieved with portions of the bp bioenergy HVO will vary depending on the source of the raw material in that portion. Pursuant to the mass balance system, the CO2e emissions saving of at least 85% for bp bioenergy HVO is calculated on the basis of a mixture which includes amounts with varying CO2e emissions savings. However, it is always at least 85% on a mass-balanced basis. 

 

The calculation for the saving is as follows:
% CO2e emissions saving = (EFF – ERF) / EFF x 100
ERF = total emissions from the renewable fuel
EFF = total emissions from fossil fuel comparator

 

Sometimes this approach to expressing CO2e emissions savings is described as being on a “lifecycle basis”. Using bp bioenergy HVO does not mean a reduction in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions at the vehicle tailpipe. As with diesel, the combustion of bp bioenergy HVO leads to CO2 – and other emissions - at the vehicle tailpipe. However, standard carbon accounting practices do not include emissions from the combustion of renewable fuels because they are not net contributors to atmospheric CO2 levels over the fuel lifecycle.

Q. What do you mean by "mass balance"?
The UK RTFO Order describes “mass balance” as a system of calculation which— (a) allows amounts of relevant feedstock or fuel with different sustainability characteristics to be mixed (“the mixture”); (b) provides for the sustainability characteristics of amounts added to the mixture to be attributed to other amounts withdrawn from the mixture; and (c) requires the sustainability characteristics attributed to the sum of the amounts withdrawn from the mixture to be the same, and in the same quantities, as the sustainability characteristics attributed to the sum of the amounts added to the mixture. 
Q. What does the ‘e’ mean in CO2e?
‘e’ stands for equivalent. Carbon dioxide (CO2) is not the only greenhouse gas (GHG); also associated with fuel production and combustion are other GHGs such as oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and methane (CH4) which can be emitted in minor amounts. In accordance with standard reporting practices, the emissions of all these GHGs are totalled and expressed in carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2 equivalent or CO2e) terms with reference to their global warming potential.
Q. Why do you compare against fossil diesel to calculate the CO2e saving for bp bioenergy HVO when B7 diesel, which contains biodiesel, is on sale?

B7 (which is diesel that meets the EN 590 fuel specification) includes up to 7% biodiesel (usually FAME – fatty acid methyl ester) and fossil diesel. There is no standard reference value for B7 diesel unlike fossil fuel, therefore, when calculating the CO2e emissions savings for renewable fuels, it is common industry practice to use the standard fossil fuel reference (94 gCO2e/MJ) for comparison and why we have used it to calculate the CO2e savings for bp bioenergy HVO.

 

The table below demonstrates how the CO2e saving varies with different comparator fuels, using reasonable assumptions as to average biodiesel type and content in B7 diesel in a country in a particular year. This shows that the CO2e saving is very similar when comparing bp bioenergy HVO to B7 diesel and to fossil fuel.

Fuel Carbon Intensity (gCO2e/MJ) HVO Comparative Saving (%)
bp bioenergy HVO (maximum value) 14.1 N/A
Fossil diesel (no biodiesel) 94 85
B7 diesel with 7% RME biodiesel 91.1 84.5
Average UK diesel 2022 (4.2% RME biodiesel) 92.3 84.7
Q. Using bp bioenergy HVO saves CO2e emissions – does that mean a reduction in CO2 emissions at the vehicle tailpipe?
No. As with diesel, the combustion of bp bioenergy HVO leads to carbon dioxide (CO2) – and other emissions - at the vehicle tailpipe. However, standard carbon accounting practices do not include emissions from the combustion of renewable fuels because they are not net contributors to atmospheric CO2 levels over the fuel lifecycle.
Q. What is bp bioenergy HVO?

bp bioenergy HVO is a lower carbon* type of diesel fuel made from renewable, waste-derived raw materials of biological origin, such as used cooking oil. It complies with the paraffinic diesel fuel standard BS EN 15940.

 

*‘Well-to-Wheel’ basis (i.e. from fuel production to end-use by the customer). CO2e saving (at least 85%) compared to fossil fuels is calculated on a mass balance basis in accordance with 2024 RTFO Compliance Guidance. bp bioenergy HVO is produced
from waste-derived feedstocks of biological origin that meet the requirements of a renewable transport fuel for the purposes of The Energy Act 2004 and the Renewable Transport Fuel Obligations Order 2007.
Q. What does HVO stand for?
HVO stands for Hydrotreated Vegetable Oil.
Q. Why should I buy bp bioenergy HVO?

bp bioenergy HVO is a renewable fuel*, meeting the BS EN 15940 paraffinic diesel fuel specification, and is a direct substitute for diesel. It’s a ‘drop-in’ fuel that can be used today in HVO compatible vehicles** without any modifications or the need to buy new vehicles, and offers a range of benefits to fleets:

  • Delivers a well-to-wheel CO2e emissions saving of at least 85% calculated on a mass balance basis compared to fossil diesel***
  • If bp bioenergy HVO isn’t available the next time you refuel, you can top-up with diesel. bp bioenergy HVO can also be used interchangeably with diesel.**
  • Year-round use – with a Cold Filter Plugging Point of -15°C maximum, it meets the same low temperature requirement as UK winter diesel (BS EN 590) but throughout the year.
  • It’s specially formulated to help clean and protect engines, thanks to our innovative ACTIVE technology formula, which is designed to remove existing harmful deposits from critical engine components and prevent them from building up.
 
* bp bioenergy HVO is produced from waste-derived feedstocks of biological origin that meet the requirements of a renewable transport fuel for the purposes of The Energy Act 2004 and the Renewable Transport Fuel Obligations Order 2007.
 
** Suitable for vehicles and engines approved by the manufacturer to use EN 15940 fuels in accordance with the manufacturer’s guidelines.
 
*** We calculate the CO2e emissions saving from fuel production to end use by the customer (‘Well-to-Wheel’) in accordance with the 2024 RTFO Compliance Guidance (Section 8), on a mass balance basis using the reference value 94 g CO2e/MJ for fossil fuels. 
Q. How is bp bioenergy HVO a renewable fuel?
bp bioenergy HVO is produced from renewable, waste derived feedstocks – such as used cooking oil - that meet the requirements of the RED II Directive.
Q. Is this fuel compatible with all diesel vehicles e.g. older trucks?

bp bioenergy HVO meets the BS EN 15940 specification and can be used in diesel vehicles without any modifications, provided the vehicle is approved by the manufacturer to use EN 15940 fuels and it is used in accordance with manufacturer’s guidelines. To show this, as required by legislation, bp bioenergy HVO fuel pumps will display an ‘XTL’ label. From October 2018, manufacturers should have included a corresponding ‘XTL’ label on the fuel tank of vehicles approved to use HVO. Vehicles manufactured before this date may be compatible with bp bioenergy HVO but won’t be labelled. If in any doubt about HVO compatibility, please consult your vehicle manufacturer prior to use.

 

bp bioenergy HVO will only be available in HGV lanes, on high-speed HGV pumps and at limited bp sites; it is not being sold at the retail forecourt pumps for passenger cars.

Q. What does XTL mean?

BS EN 16942 specifies how fuel pumps and nozzles must be labelled to denote the fuel type. Additionally, these labels are also required to be present on the vehicle’s fuel filler cap or tank to show fuel compatibility.

 

The identifier for HVO – and other paraffinic diesel fuels - is XTL:

 

X is a variable to represent the starting energy source used for the fuel

 

TL = To Liquid

Q. Will the colour of the pump or the size of the nozzle be different from regular diesel?

The nozzle and hose will be the same as for diesel, although there will be a different colour for the product branding at the pump, as well as ‘XTL’ labelling as required by legislation. There will also be a talking pump to announce that you have picked up the nozzle for bp bioenergy HVO.  

 

If in any doubt about vehicle compatibility with HVO, please consult the manufacturer prior to use.

Q. What if I already have diesel in my vehicle tank, can I still fill up with this new fuel?
Provided your vehicle is approved by the manufacturer to use EN 15940 fuels and it is used in accordance with the manufacturer’s guidelines, you can use bp bioenergy HVO interchangeably with diesel or mixed with diesel already in your vehicle tank. If in any doubt about vehicle compatibility with HVO, please consult the manufacturer prior to use.
Q. Is HVO a so-called e-fuel?
No, although both HVO and e-fuels can be classified as XTL (X-to-Liquid) fuels. E-fuels, also called synfuels, are fuels that are synthesized entirely from hydrogen and carbon dioxide. HVO, on the other hand, is produced from renewable, waste-derived materials. When biomass is used as the feedstock, HVO is also known as a BTL (Biomass-to-Liquid) fuel.
Q. How will I know how much CO2e I’ve saved by using bp bioenergy HVO?
Customers will be provided with a Biofuels Information Sheet (BIS) to show the amount of CO2e emissions savings they have achieved compared to fossil diesel based upon bp bioenergy HVO purchases made using a fuel card. BISs will be provided on a quarterly basis.
Q. Where will drivers be able to access this fuel?

bp bioenergy HVO will only be available in HGV lanes on the high-speed pumps at limited bp sites; it is not being sold at the retail forecourt pumps for passenger cars.

We’re currently piloting bp bioenergy HVO at 4 sites in the UK, with further sites planned in the next few months in the UK and across Europe.

 

Customers can download our site list, which is within the downloads section of our website.

Q. Will bp bioenergy HVO give the same fuel economy as the diesel I currently use?
There may be a minor increase in volumetric fuel consumption for bp bioenergy HVO compared to BS EN 590 diesel on a like-for-like basis due to HVO’s lower energy density.
Q. What about its performance in winter? Will bp bioenergy HVO still perform in cold conditions?
Drivers can use bp bioenergy HVO all year round. It meets the same low temperature requirement as UK winter diesel (BS EN 590) with a Cold Filter Plugging Point (CFPP) of -15°C maximum, but throughout the year.  
Q. You say this fuel contains ‘ACTIVE technology’; what’s ‘ACTIVE technology’?
ACTIVE technology is the name we give to our innovative engine cleaning and protection formula that’s contained in bp bioenergy HVO. It’s designed to remove existing harmful deposits from critical engine components, such as fuel injectors, and prevent them from building up. Clean engines can work as the manufacturer intended.
Q. What should I do if I’ve refuelled with bp bioenergy HVO by mistake and my vehicle isn’t HVO compatible?
bp bioenergy HVO is only suitable for vehicles and engines approved by the manufacturer to use EN 15940 fuels in accordance with the manufacturer’s guidelines. You should check with your manufacturer what actions you should take if you have mistakenly refuelled with bp bioenergy HVO and your vehicle is not approved to use EN 15940 fuels.
Q. Where can I find out more information about bp’s lower carbon businesses?

We're investing in today's energy system, which is mainly oil and gas – and, not or – in our transition and the energy transition. And while we’re mostly in oil and gas today, we’ve increased global investment in our lower carbon, convenience stores and power trading businesses (what we call our ‘transition growth engines’) from around 3% in 2019 to around 30% in 2022.


You can find out more here.